Guiding Patients From First Signs And Symptoms To Intervention

Guiding Patients from First Signs and Symptoms to Intervention

people in a living room

Diagnosis of MCI due to AD is an opportunity for meaningful interventions.

Doctors have access to a range of evidence-based early interventions after diagnosis of MCI due to AD.3 Early diagnosis of Alzheimer´s disease also provides the opportunity to prepare financial and end-of-life plans while cognitive impairment remains mild.

The current pharmacological landscape for managing patients with Alzheimer’s disease includes symptomatic treatments, clinical trials, and treatments for comorbidities such as depression.

Nonpharmacological interventions may help change the direction of cognitive decline

In the 2-year observational FINGER study, elderly patients showed 25 to 150% improvements in cognition due to non-pharmaceutical post-testing interventions.

Care partner interventions are an important component of overall care

As of 2017, 48% of care partners were unpaid while caring for a spouse, parent, or family member. Dementia care partners tend to provide more extensive assistance as the disease progresses, with an emphasis on self-care and mobility.

The care required of family members can result in increased emotional stress and feelings of depression. Tailored interventions can have a positive impact on the well-being of care partners. Continued support for care partners is instrumental in treating Alzheimer’s disease holistically.

Contact us or visit us and we will help you during this process. Schedule your appointment today!

How To Take Care Of Your Loved Ones With Dementia And Alzheimer’s During The Holiday Season?

How to take care of your loved ones with Dementia and Alzheimer’s during the holiday season?

A group of ladies showing their artwork

Holiday seasons are warm and welcoming as friends and families get together and celebrate several cultural events. But if there is a loved one at home who has dementia or Alzheimer’s you, as a caregiver, might have to do things a bit differently this time. With careful planning and understanding, caregivers can still celebrate and have fun and include their loved ones on Christmas with Dementia.

Ways to Help Loved Ones with Dementia and Alzheimer’s Enjoy the Holidays

➢   Adjust Your Expectations

Individuals with Alzheimer’s generally do best when a routine is kept up – and the holidays are nothing but a routine. If you are a family caregiver, you are the best judge of the limits you have to set. The professionals point out that your circumstance is different now and you don’t need to satisfy the desires of other people. Acknowledge the fact that numerous family traditions may require a bit of tweaking so as to suit your present situation.

➢   Involve the seniors in the preparations

Ensure you incorporate your adored ones in planning the event. This will enable them to be prepared, so when guests arrive, they won’t be overwhelmed. This will likewise give them a sense of purpose just as a stake in having the event be a success. If they feel like cooking, welcome them to help and have them decorate the table. If there will be a gift exchange, have them with you in wrapping gifts.

➢   Acquaint others with the situation

The holidays are loaded with emotions, so it can tell visitors what’s in store before they arrive. If the individual is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, relatives and companions probably won’t see any changes. In any case, the person with dementia may experience difficulty following discussion or will in general repeat him-or herself. Family can help with communication by being understanding, not interrupting or correcting, and giving the individual time to complete his or her thoughts.

If the person is in the middle or late stage of Alzheimer’s, there might be critical changes in intellectual abilities since the last time an out-of-town companion or relative has visited. These progressions can be difficult to accept. Ensure visitors understand that the disease and not the person brings about changes in the behavior and memory.

➢   Be flexible

If your loved one becomes overwhelmed, have a calm space ready where they can go. If they begin carrying on such that’s inappropriate, be prepared and have the plan of activity prepared.

➢   Keep holiday gatherings small

Large groups can be extremely confusing and upsetting to somebody with Alzheimer’s, so it’s best to keep the get-together more private. Rather than a gathering with individuals milling about, you might need to have a sit-down supper. If caregiving has reduced the amount of time, you need to plan, make it a potluck.

Enjoy holiday season best with precautions

It’s alright to invest energy preparing for and enjoying the majority of the “things” that make up the holidays. However, putting feelings ahead of the festivities for you and your cherished one may end up being the best blessing, an ideal approach to celebrate the season of all.

 

If you need ideas to be more creative with your loved ones during the holiday season, you can schedule a visit with us, and we will provide you the best support.